Types of Projects

Yorventure will fund two types of projects; community projects that comply with ENTRUST category D criteria, and environmental projects that comply with ENTRUST category DA criteria.

COMMUNITY

Category D – public parks and general public amenities

The project must be for the provision, maintenance or improvement of a public park or another public amenity at a single identifiable site address. The intent of the work to be undertaken must be to provide, maintain or improve an amenity for the general public.

“Provision” of amenities may include the purchase of land, buildings and new or replacement items. Further examples include building a new village hall, creating a new public open space and developing a new nature reserve.

“Maintenance” may include the costs of repair works or costs associated with maintaining a site.

“Improvement” may include treatments to enhance amenities, such as new heating systems, double glazing or a suspended ceiling to improve thermal efficiency, a new floor or improving the surfacing of pathways. The purchase of equipment that will improve a public amenity, such as tables and chairs for example, can also be included.

Projects that enhance the appearance of public amenities might be allowed, but planting to screen a factory (for example) would not be allowed because a factory is not a public amenity.

A “public park” or “public amenity” is one that is open at times convenient for the general public. Projects with the most generous arrangements for public access will be favoured and the absolute minimum public access requirement is four evenings or two days every week, or 104 days in any one-year. A “public amenity” is any space, facility or building that can be enjoyed by the general public for leisure, recreation or entertainment. Amenities must be specific – a village, a town centre, a view, offices, services, consultation, engagement, or facilitation etc. are not general public amenities. General public amenities include:

  • Museums
  • Activity centres
  • Village halls
  • Village greens
  • Church yards
  • Public play grounds
  • Sports fields and facilities
  • Libraries
  • Public rights of way / footpaths
  • Nature reserves
  • Public parks
  • Bridle ways
  • Community centres
  • Cycle paths
  • Country parks
  • Scout or Guide huts
  • Skate parks.

Projects involving a sports club may be allowed if the club is operated on a not-for-profit basis and allows the general public to join. Golf courses are not considered to be general public amenities unless they are municipal or operate on the principle that anyone can pay and play at any time. Clubs may be asked for information about membership fees so that Yorventure can gauge whether they are restrictively expensive.

Projects involving facilities, buildings and spaces that are not normally regarded as public amenities could be allowed if an intention to treat the facility as a genuine public amenity is clearly demonstrated. An example would be a space created inside a building of religious worship where the general public can book and use the amenity for purposes that do not have to be associated with religion.

Neither the amenity nor the organisation running it must operate for the purpose of making and distributing profit. A charge for entry or use may be made, but the proceeds must not be treated or distributed as profit.

Sometimes projects under object d are “partially compliant”. Only the proportion of the project that complies with the landfill tax regulations can be funded with landfill tax money so in these cases other sources of money to fund the rest of the project will need to be found. The principle of “proportionality” is put into practice by working out the percentage of project activity that is compliant by looking at the level of time and/or space of the amenity that is available to the general public. This percentage is then applied to the total cost of the project to calculate how much landfill tax money can be spent on it. So, for example, if 37% of your project is compliant, then 37% of the project cost can be funded with landfill tax money.

Where an amenity’s first use is not primarily a public amenity but has a secondary function that does involve general public use, access for the public must be in line with other similar facilities that are open to the general public i.e. operate on a ‘like for like’ basis. Access arrangements must operate on a like-for-like basis with a similar general public amenity. The project must not impose limitations on access such as a booking system, or allocated times of entry where it is not usual for the ‘like’ to operate in this way.

ENVIRONMENTAL

Category DA – conservation or promotion of biological diversity

The project must be for the protection of the environment, and for the conservation or promotion of biological diversity through the provision, conservation, restoration or enhancement of a natural habitat, or, the maintenance or recovery of a species in its natural habitat, on land or in water situated in the vicinity of a landfill site.

The project is not eligible for category DA funding if it involves works which:

  • (a) are required to be carried out in accordance with an agreement made under section 16 of the National Parks and Access to the Countryside Act 1949
  • (b) are required to be carried out in accordance with an agreement made under section 15 of the Countryside Act 1968
  • (d) give effect to any provision of a management scheme under section 28J of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 or are required to be carried out by a notice served under section 28K of that Act
  • (e) are wholly or partly required to be carried out by a relevant condition

The intent of the project must be to deliver specific targets for habitats on sites with a specific geographical context. These projects should be for the protection of the natural environment in the context of biodiversity. Where a specific habitat or species is to be conserved and works are undertaken on a specific habitat then this will be seen as conservation and the undertaking of this work will be seen as the promotion of biodiversity.

You must be able to demonstrate the conservation measures you will be putting into practice at the specific site. These can include:

Research

Would enable specific research to be undertaken on a specific habitat found there or species where the intent is to conserve, restore or enhance the habitat to the benefit of biodiversity.

Recording

Would enable specific recording to be undertaken on a specific habitat and species where the intent is to conserve, restore or enhance the habitat to the benefit of biodiversity.

Management

Would enable specific management plans and proposals to be undertaken where the intent is to conserve, restore or enhance the habitat to the benefit of biodiversity.

Monitoring

Would enable specific monitoring to be undertaken where the intent is to conserve, restore or enhance the habitat to the benefit of biodiversity.

Education

Would be eligible and enable education to be relayed on a specific habitat or species as identified in the project. Provision of education material would also be eligible. Education cannot be the main intent of the project but relaying information about the project and the work you undertake can be regarded as a legitimate project activity. Costs can include: to film and produce video, to write, print and publish written material, to provide school packs on the specific site based habitat or species.

Projects will need to be linked to a habitat in a specific site based geographical context and would include land and water habitats. A project site can have multiple habitats and you apply to fund a project for a specific site to cover a range or number or habitats.

There must be a specific area identified with a single geographical context and all works must either be on land or in water.

General public access to project sites is not required for category DA projects.

Examples of activities that will be allowed as part of the project:

  • delivery of a specific element of a Biodiversity Action Plan where there are specific habitats with identified conservation objectives at a single project site
  • delivery of identifiable elements of site based habitat management activities in the context of a BAP and/or LBAP
  • reintroduction programs to a specific habitat
  • Management planning for nature conservation where this is directly linked to a specific habitat at a specific project site

Activity that is not allowed:

  • Multiple project site applications under one project application
  • Strategies, biodiversity planning process, Biodiversity Action Plans or LBAP’s per se though a specific habitat within the context of a single site may be eligible.
  • Work on private land where there is no evidence of the intent to meet conservation aims in the context of biodiversity
  • Species research, monitoring or management unless it is at a specific site identified in the project application.
  • Neither the project site nor the organisation running it must operate for the purpose of making and distributing profit. A charge for entry or use may be made, but the proceeds must not be treated as, or distributed as profit and must be spent back on the project.
  • Projects must involve a lead partner. The Lead Partner takes responsibility for co-ordinating BAP’s and LBAP’s. Theirs is the responsibility to work to the plan, monitor and review progress with the implementations of Habitat Action Plans. The Lead Partners identify the range of organisations that wish to contribute to the implementation of the plans and together they work to secure funding and to deliver the actions. Statutory Agencies, for example the Forestry Commission, English Nature and the Environment Agency, have been identified as the Lead Agencies for steering the implementation of the Habitat Action Plans. Many of these agencies also act as Contact Points for the Species Action Plans. In this role they respond to many of the general enquires made about the plan and to provide advice, assistance and encouragement to the Lead Partners. Information on BAPs and LBAPs, along with contact points, can be found on the UKBAP website.